Month: January 2019

Great Escapes: Sonoma’s Quirky, Rustic Charms – Barron's

The ocean view from River's End Restaurant in the town of Jenner.

The ocean view from River’s End Restaurant in the town of Jenner.

Sonoma County Tourism

It’s common for outsiders to confuse Sonoma and Napa, California’s largest wine-producing counties. But to locals, it is a bit frustrating that the two are so often conflated: they are, in fact, quite different. Geographically, Sonoma is three times larger than Napa. It also meets the sea, with over 55 miles of often rugged coastline. Culturally they differ, too. If Napa is the well-groomed bon vivant in a tailored suit readying for an evening ball, Sonoma is the one in dirtied khakis and rain-boots taking the dog for a morning walk through the redwoods.

Sonoma County sits in a valley about 50 miles due-north of San Francisco, under the watchful glare of the Mayacamas and Sonoma mountain ranges. With over 1,700 square miles of land, the county encompasses many different habitats, from grassland to coastal scrub, to redwood and oak forests to marshland, with myriad microclimates in between. Home to exceptionally fertile soils, farming makes up a considerable bulk of Sonoma’s economy, approximately 21% of its GDP, according to the Sonoma County Farm Bureau. Over 60,000 acres go towards grape growing.

It is thought that the first vines were planted by Russians in 1821 at Fort Ross. Still visitable today, just up the coast from the town of Jenner, the fort was the southernmost Russian settlement in the 19th century North American fur trade. The true beginning of Sonoma (and California’s) wine industry, though, began with several thousand grape vines planted some years later by Franciscan monks from Spain at the mission San Francisco Solano, in the modern city of Sonoma. Through the century, numerous settlers continued planting grapes throughout the area, a practice that continues today.

boon hotel+spa is a chic 14-room boutique in the Russian River Valley.

boon hotel+spa is a chic 14-room boutique in the Russian River Valley.

Sonoma County Tourism

STAY

There is no dearth of exceptional hotels in Sonoma, many of them locally owned. One that truly shines is the family-run Farmhouse Inn, a quaint, uber-homey place with a Michelin-starred restaurant and exceptionally helpful staff (Conde Nast Traveller calls it the third Best Hotel in North America for 2019). Another award-winner is the Timber Cove Resort, a pitch-perfect fusion of rustic and luxury overlooking a jaw-dropping view of the Pacific, also with splendid seasonal eats (try the salmon wings).

If pining for redwoods, try a stay at boon hotel+spa, a chic 14-room boutique in the woodsy and remote Russian River Valley. A few minutes down the road is the awe-inspiring Armstrong Redwoods State Natural Reserve, which gets relatively few visitors. Stay warm with the wood-burning fire in your room or in the Jacuzzi with a local wine or brew and do make sure to get a massage. If overnighting in San Francisco, try the recently renovated Hotel Kabuki in Japantown.

EAT

Fine wine, of course, demands fine food. All aforementioned hotels boast phenomenal restaurants—boon’s eatery, located in the nearby town of Guerneville, is called boon eat+drink, a small, uber-locally sourced place (also try a mezcal cocktail at the nearby El Barrio)—but there is a plethora of lovely eateries in Sonoma. In Healdsburg, get a reservation at Single Thread, which serves Michelin-starred Japanese-inspired fine-dining.

Sonoma has no shortage of great restaurants. Here, Valette in Healdsburg

Chris Hardy

Nearby is Valette, a boisterous place where the food spotlights local producers (try the juniper-marinated venison loin), as well as a wonderful new salumeria called Journeyman Meat Co. In the coastal town of Jenner, do not miss the artfully-prepared local seafood and stunning ocean views at the River’s End Restaurant, built upon a dramatic bluff. For breakfast lovers, check out the wonderfully eccentric Della Fattoria in historic Petaluma, whose fresh-baked bread is drool-inducing.

DRINK

There are over 425 wineries in Sonoma County. One can tour pretty much all of them, each with its own style and focus. For laid-back vibes, visit Belden Barns, an idyllic estate located atop Sonoma Mountain. Run by a friendly young family originally from outside the region, they are not afraid of vino experimentation; their fantastic Grüner Veltliner was the first to be planted in Sonoma. For something else a bit different, sample the splendid ciders at Horse & Plow. In the Barlow—a collection of shops, restaurants, and cafes converted from an old apple cannery in Sebastopol—try the award-winning sloe (an obscure berry) gin at Spirit Works Distillery. Also in the Barlow is the tasting room for MacPhail Wines, another family-run vineyard, which often hosts vinyl-centric tasting events.

EXPLORE

Wine is only one reason to visit Sonoma. Hiking trails abound across the county, from the Laguna de Santa Rosa Wetlands, accessible via Sebastopol, to the numerous coastal trails around Jenner. Kayakers can hit the slow-going Russian River for some excellent rides. Cyclists, too, have lots to choose from. Very worthwhile for anyone is the Jack London State Historic Park, which boasts over 20 miles of trails and an impressive museum built in the cottage of the iconic writer’s widow, Charmian.

For a rejuvenating experience unlike any outside Japan, make the trip to Osmosis Day Spa Sanctuary. The place is known for its unique cedar enzyme bath, a tub of shredded white cedar, rice bran, and a special bio-catalyst. The mixture, which is said to boost metabolism and circulation, is naturally heated by its own fermentation, meaning that, when you lie in it, you are covered in life.

The writer was a guest of Sonoma County Tourism

North state fishing report for week of Jan. 25 – Chico Enterprise-Record

TOP PICKS

SHASTA LAKE: With the low pressure storm front that moved through, the fishing was great this past week with some really nice reaction bite fish reported. Alabama rigs, spinnerbaits, crankbaits, glidebaits, and jerkbaits were all great for putting shallow feeding fish in the boat. The water clarity is stained around the lake and it is on the rise so be cautious when boating and watch for debris.

SACRAMENTO RIVER, Red Bluff to Colusa: Fishing slowed for trout and steelhead over the weekend as the river blew out from Keswick Dam through the metro area. A few trophy-size stripers were being caught near Corning and Colusa before the storm on swim baits

SACRAMENTO RIVER, Verona to Colusa: Sturgeon fishing is slow at First Beach and Second Beach at Knights Landing but should improve with last week’s storms. Heavy rain fell over the weekend. Striper fishing is slow near Knights Landing and Verona, but a few fish are being caught on swimbaits. Salmon season is closed.

FEATHER RIVER: Striper and sturgeon fishing remains slow. The river blew out late last week because of heavy rain. Anglers are awaiting February’s steelhead smolt release to boost striper fishing, while sturgeon fishing could pick up this week at the mouth of the Bear River. Steelhead are being caught from Gridley up to Oroville Dam.

LAKE OROVILLE: Jamey Sorensen of North Valley Tackle said the lake water level is rising daily due to the recent storms. It’s cold and dirty everywhere, but there’s hope, as larger 2-pound bass are finally showing once again. Sorensen said he’d target them using reaction baits in the incoming water. Those who want numbers should continue to use finesse baits.

THERMALITO AFTERBAY: Jamey Soresen of North Valley Tackle said there’s a good ripbait bass bite along the rock wall, but stay away from the tules just a bit longer until the end of duck hunting season.

Far North Lakes and Rivers

LAKE ALMANOR: Due to winter storms that dropped substantial amounts of snow and rain there hasn’t been much going on around the lake as far as fishing goes. Ice continues to build in the shallows and coves and the lake level has risen slightly. The Canyon dam boat ramp is open and able to be launched from. Weather outlook for the next week is spring like and should improve the fishing around the lake.

BAUM LAKE: Fishing is still great for fly fisherman that have ventured out. The average size of the fish has not improved much yet, but the bigger fish should start to show themselves. Midging is still the best choice for this fishery.

LEWISTON LAKE: Not a lot of reports but the few anglers that have gone have had some great success. Same as last week, fish are spooky in the really clear water conditions, so you will need to sneak around from spot to spot carefully and use a longer leader. Midging has been best for fly fisherman around the lake.

PIT RIVER: Due to recent storms the pit is blown out and unable to be waded. Next week has clear weather in the forecast so the best thing you can do is keep an eye on the flows until they drop enough to get out there and give it a shot.

Sacramento Valley

AMERICAN RIVER: The river opened between Hazel Avenue and Nimbus Hatchery for steelhead on Jan. 1. Fishing has been best in the Sunrise area, where anglers are drifting roe or pieces of nightcrawlers, but is slow overall. Egg patterns also are working for fly fishermen. Flows over the weekend at Fair Oaks were 1,780 cfs, but could increase as water is released from Folsom Lake, where levels increased more than 12 feet last week.

FOLSOM LAKE: The lake level increased from 393 feet elevation to 407.5 feet after last week’s big rainstorms. The 5 mph speed limit has been lifted. Parks officials warned about logs and other debris. The low water ramp at Granite Bay and the Hobie Cove ramp at Brown’s Ravine are the only two ramps in operation. Fishing is slow for bass and trout, with little effort. Speedy Shiners with flashers are tricking a few trout and salmon near Brown’s Ravine 20 to 35 feet down.

SACRAMENTO RIVER, Dunsmuir: Rapidly changing flows have trout fishing slow. Flows hit 10,000 cfs last week at the Delta gauge, and were down to 6,500 cfs over the weekend. The river is blown out.

SACRAMENTO RIVER, Redding to Red Bluff: The Sacramento River turned muddy over the weekend after heavy rain in the Redding area. Trout fishing was good prior to last week’s rain, but stalled as the river blew out. Expect good conditions again this week, although the water may be muddy because of this summer’s fires.

SACRAMENTO RIVER, Sacramento: Sturgeon and striper fishing has been slow. More sturgeon should move in with rain. A few stripers are being caught in the deepwater channel on large and jumbo minnows.

Trinity/Klamath Rivers

KLAMATH RIVER, Hornbrook: The Upper Klamath near Hornbrook remained fishable after last week’s heavy rain, as flows were held back at Iron Gate Dam. The river  was blown out below Interstate 5. Expect fresh fish to move up from the lower river with the rain. Flows at Iron Gate rose from 950 cfs to 1,250 cfs.

KLAMATH RIVER, Happy Camp: Steelhead fishing was good before last week’s rain pushed the Middle Klamath over its banks. The river may drop into shape by the weekend. At Seiad Valley near Happy Camp, flows jumped from 1,752 cfs to more than 10,000 cfs. They were down to 9,500 cfs late Sunday. Flows at Orleans increased from 3,630 cfs to 50,200 cfs.

KLAMATH RIVER, Klamath Glen: The Klamath hits its highest level since February 2017 over the weekend when flows at Klamath Glen jumped from 12 feet to 29 feet over four days. Heavy rain increased flows from 14,450 cfs a week ago to 123,000 cfs on Sunday. The river is high and muddy, but the higher flows should draw in winter steelhead from the ocean.

TRINITY RIVER: The river blew out with last week’s heavy rain, but should have fresh adult steelhead spread throughout the Trinity after flows drop this week. Flows at Lewiston remained 300 cfs, but quickly increased below the dam. Flows at Douglas City shot up from 475 cfs a week ago to 3,000 cfs, and were down to 1,670 cfs late Sunday. Flows at Junction City went up from 544 cfs to more than 4,000 cfs before dropping back to 2,530 cfs. The lower end was already high at 4,624 cfs at Hoopa, but rose to 34,200 cfs.

Northern Foothills

BULLARDS BAR: The dam at 40 feet on typical kokanee baits had been the ticket, but the lake has come up more than 10 feet in the past week. It’s dirty and cold. Brett Brady of Bare Bones Guide Service recommended giving it a week for conditions to stabilize and the bite to get back its typical full speed.

CAMP FAR WEST: Recent rains have brought the lake level up high enough to use one lane of the concrete launch ramp at North Shore Resort, according to Kathy DeRossett. Camp Far West will hold a bass tournament on February 23. We’ll have more details as they become available.

COLLINS LAKE: A rare zero fish on the Collins Lake Recreation Area lunker list this week was due to storms that dampened angler traffic. Next to no one was fishing. Fortunately the upcoming forecast looks better. Those who go should consider the higher lake water level 17 feet from full, colder temperatures and a healthy stain on the water, and use fish scented baits.

HALSEY: This small afterbay located in Auburn was stocked, according to Craig Newton of Will Fish Tackle. It’s typical planter fishing, but quite possibly fished the best of the local lakes.

North Coast lakes

LAKE BERRYESSA: The fishing is still steady, but not quite as red hot as it has been the past few weeks. The spots that are holding the concentration of baitfish seemed to be tougher for catching fish than they had been. Alabama rigs are still getting bit, but for the most part the bite has been down deeper and more of a finesse style bite all around.

BLACK BUTTE LAKE: The lake has filled almost completely after the last storm but it is extremely muddy and there is an enormous amount of debris floating, some of which are full sized trees floating dangerously below the surface making them hard to see. Although fishing is completely shut off, the duck hunters have been doing well this past week now that you can set up in the creeks and willows. Use caution in the strong winds, only Eagles Pass launch is open, making it a long dangerous boat ride in whitecaps.

CLEAR LAKE: Bass fishing is improving some with most fish being caught on Alabama rigs and rip baits. The crappie are biting again on the redbud side of the lake, but there are a lot of boats concentrated in small areas where the fish are holding. The catfish bite is picking up and will continue to improve the next few weeks with more of the bigger fish showing up. Giant bluegills can still be caught just about anywhere around the lake right now with many being caught over 1-pound.

LAKE SONOMA: The lake has gotten pretty stained after recent storms with more debris floating as well. Not many anglers went out this past week, but for those that did the fish were all down deeper and it was a finesse bite and a small football jig bite.

UPPER BLUE LAKES: The water remains very muddy and there haven’t been any reports from anglers going out and attempting to catch bass or trout.

North Coast Rivers

North Coast streams and rivers are regulated by low flow closures. Always call ahead to determine the condition of the river you want to fish. If not mentioned, the river is closed or no reports. The DFW’s Low Flow Closure Hotline for north coast rivers is (707) 822-3164. South Central Coast streams number is (831) 649-2886.New low flow closures for Mendocino, Sonoma and Marin counties, Oct. 1-April 30, call (707) 822-3164 for Mendocino, (707) 944-5533 for Sonoma, Marin and Napa.

CHETCO RIVER, Brookings, Ore.: The river blew out at 30,000 cfs over the weekend, its highest level in two years. Steelhead fishing was on the slow side before last week’s rain, but should improve this week as new fish enter with the high water. The river is expected to be in prime shape for the weekend, said guide Andy Martin of Wild Rivers fishing. According to guide Phil Desautel of Phil’s Smiling Salmon Guide Service, “On the Chetco, Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday before the storm, just about every boat had and were cleaning fish.  It was 1 to 5 hook ups per boats with mostly one or two landed. Jim Cooper of Oakland caught a 9-pound buck hatchery fish.

ELK RIVER, Port Orford, Ore.: The Elk hit 10 feet on Saturday and was down to 7 feet on Sunday. It fishes best around 4 feet. Expect new steelhead as the river drops this week.

ROGUE RIVER, Gold Beach, Ore.: Steelhead fishing was good on the lower river before last week’s storms. Flows at Agness jumped from 3,000 cfs to 70,000 cfs. With combined flows from the Illinois River and other tributaries, flows were close to 100,000 cfs on Sunday at Gold Beach. The river may remain too high all week.

RUSSIAN RIVER: As of Saturday, January 19, the Russian was dropping after the storm that produced 9.5 inches of rain in the hills North of Guerneville.  “We are looking at a high muddy river, but the good news is long term forecasts are calling for a drying spell starting on Monday and could last through the weekend and maybe longer,” Scott Heemstra of Kings Sport and Tackle in Guerneville said. “This would be great news for the Russian, since it will give it some time to drop and clear up a bit.  My fishing forecast is calling for plunking conditions to start by the end of the week and drift or lure fishing by the weekend. We are moving into prime steelhead time, so there should be plenty of fish throughout the entire system when it comes into shape.”

SMITH RIVER: The Smith remained fishable through Friday before blowing out on Saturday 70,000 cfs at Jed Smith, which is 24 feet, said guide Andy Martin of Wild Rivers Fishing. It was down to 19 feet on Sunday, or 38,500 cfs, and should fish from Tuesday on. Expect fresh steelhead as the river drops. Guide Phil Desautel of Phil’s Smiling Salmon Guide Service said it was the best fishing of the season prior to the storm, and should be very good for steelhead when it clears up.

SIXES RIVER, Port Orford, Ore.: The Sixes was well over its bank on Sunday and could remain too high to fish most of this week.

Sierra Lakes and Rivers

BOCA RESERVOIR: Miles Zimmerman of Mountain Hardware and Sports said the area received rain. He is advising anglers to stay off the ice.

CARSON RIVER (East, West): Todd Sodaro of Todd’s Bait and Tackle and the Alpine County Fish and Game Commission finally saw a car parked at the year-round C&R artificials only section of the East Carson, but he couldn’t get a report. The rivers are up, but the East Carson still has a beautiful green tinge. The weather was terrible but is expected to improve dramatically through the end of January. Better times are ahead.

DAVIS LAKE: Jeanne Graham, J&J’s Grizzly Store said it has been raining, but more snow was expected Sunday night. The condition of the ice at the dam is unknown. Mallard is likely inaccessible, as two feet of snow fell before it started raining.

DONNER LAKE: Miles Zimmerman of Mountain Hardware and Sports said Donner is about the only lake option in the Truckee area because it has areas plowed for parking, and the best you can expect is shore fishing for rainbows.

INDIAN CREEK RESERVOIR: Todd Sodaro of the Alpine County Fish and Game Commission and Todd’s Bait and Tackle in Markleeville said the lake froze and melted – again! On Sunday he was unsure of the condition of the ice.

JENKINSON LAKE (Sly Park): Karen Ward at Sly Park Resort said the week’s storms kept anglers at bay. The lake has come up a bit but she said the water isn’t too muddy.

LAKE TAHOE: Zach Gordon of Tahoe Sportfishing said his company based out of the Ski Run Marina in South Lake Tahoe has been getting a few trips out between the rain and the wind, but when they do, they are finding solid, fun fishing for Mackinaw off the west shore. He said the fish are deep, and they are getting them by dangling live bait right on the bottom at roughly 180 feet.

PROSSER RESERVOIR: Miles Zimmerman of Mountain Hardware and Sports in Truckee said it rained following recent snows. He advised staying off the ice at Prosser until the weather cools again.

PYRAMID LAKE: A parade of pre-frontal jumbos bit midnight cowboys and popcorn beetles from shore. Reports of 10-plus-pound fish were common, WON heard about a 16, there was photographic evidence of a 19 and unsubstantiated word of a 20. For the few boaters who got out between storms, it was more of a numbers than size game, although it can’t be overstressed that January has been about quality at Pyramid Lake. Guides gush and say these results promise a tremendous season.

STAMPEDE RESERVOIR: Miles Zimmerman of Mountain Hardware and Sports said Stampede is inaccessible due to unplowed roads.

TOPAZ LAKE: The annual trout derby is underway and is currently led by a 9-pound trout caught by Aaron Talhelm, according to staff at the Topaz General Store. There’s no registration fee to enter, and there are weekly prizes for first and second place. 21 and over only.

TRUCKEE RIVER: Except for the special regulations section from the mouth of Trout Creek at Glenshire Drive to the Nevada state line, the Truckee River has closed for the season. Miles Zimmerman of Mountain Hardware and Sports said the river offers good access at Hirschdale (Glenshire has limited access due to snow on the parking areas), and recommended nymphing with stoneflies and worms. Remember, barbless, artificials, catch and release only.

WEBBER LAKE: The access gate has been closed for the season. Determined anglers can walk in. The road may be covered in snow.

WEST WALKER RIVER: Staffers at the Walker General Store are still reporting they haven’t seen any fishermen in weeks on the C&R, barbless, artificials only fishery.

North Saltwater

BERKELEY: Partyboats from Berkeley were not operating and crew were busily readying them for the upcoming season. Private boats ventured from Berkeley marina all throughout the Bay area to fish sturgeon in South Bay, San Pablo Bay or pretty much anywhere lots of fresh water runoff entered the Bay. Striped bass and flounder were all around the shorelines from Berkeley down around South Bay and up to San Francisco.

BODEGA BAY: Fantastic crabbing was on tap for passengers of New Sea Angler. The boat scores limits for 11 passengers and crew in just two hours. Sanddabs were readily available in deeper water. Shore spots had been shut down by weather and seas until the weekend,which was so nice that people came out to give fishing and crabbing a try from boats and also from shore spots like the jetty, Doran Beach and Salmon Creek.

EMERYVILLE: The partyboat fleet is undergoing maintenance and upgrades, but private party boats made it out to chase sturgeon, stripers, flounder and kingfish. Both boats and local shore fishers did well at nearby Alameda Rock Wall. The best sturgeon fishing was near the bridges in South Bay or right off major freshwater inflows.

EUREKA: Crabbers out of Trinidad, Eureka and Crescent City got good news because domoic acid testing of Dungeness crab showed no significant health threat and all areas became open to recreational crabbers and soon to commercial crabbers. Herring runs continued in Humboldt Bay. Shore anglers were out of luck all week due to wind and seas and rain.

FORT BRAGG: Shore spots were all blown out, even good ol’ Noyo Jetty, which is the last safe spot in most conditions. Finally, by the weekend things calmed enough and the weather turned nice, so people came back out and made a go of it, though high Noyo River flows were still a problem.

HALF MOON BAY: Crab and sanddab combo trips were a success beginning Friday on. People could catch all the sanddabs they felt they needed for an extended family feast. The crew pulled easy limits of Dungeness crab for passengers and crew alike. Weekend weather was so nice that crowds of people came out to line the jetty and public pier to crab and fish inside Pillar Point harbor. Local beaches were good for surfperch.

SAN FRANCISCO: The Fisherman’s Wharf fleet was at dock or hauled out for maintenance and upgrades. Argo ran trips to San Pablo Bay when the weather calmed to catch stripers and sturgeon. Private boats and shore anglers worked the shoreline from AT&T Park to below Coyote Point, hooking up with stripers, kingfish, flounder, sharks and rays.

The weekly fishing report, compiled by Western Outdoor News, highlights the best angling opportunities in the north state. A longer version, with many more lakes and rivers, can be seen online at chicoer.com/sports.

Sebastopol Police and Sheriff's Log, Jan. 14-20 | News – Sonoma West

Sebastopol Police Log

The following are excerpted from Sebastopol Police Department and Sonoma County Sheriff’s daily log entries.

MONDAY, JANUARY 14

8:32 a.m. Driving with suspended license on Morris Street. Arrest made.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16

10:26 p.m. Disorderly conduct (alcohol), obstructing/resisting a Peace Officer/Emergency Medical Technician and probation violation on Petaluma Avenue. Arrest made.

11:51 p.m. Attempted burglary on Gravenstein Highway North. Pending further investigation.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17

6:37 p.m. Forgery and grand theft on Laguna Parkway. Referred to other agency.

10:01 p.m. Driving without a license on Gravenstein Highway South and Cooper Road. Arrest made.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 18

1:29 a.m. Controlled substance paraphernalia on Petaluma Avenue and Palm Avenue. Arrest made.

11:15 a.m. Criminal threats, probation violation, driving without a license, minor in possession of alcohol on Ragle Road. Arrest made.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 19

1:13 a.m. Controlled substance paraphernalia and misdemeanor warrant on Gravenstein Highway South. Arrest made.

1:37 a.m. Assault with intent to commit rape on McKinley Street. Pending further investigation.

12:28 p.m. DUI (alcohol), driving on suspended license, probation violation and traffic offense on Bodega Avenue and High Street. Arrest made.

3:58 p.m. Probation violation on Fircrest Avenue. Arrest made.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 20

11:28 a.m. Driving without a license on McKinley Street. Arrest made.

11:37 a.m. Parole violation on Laguna Parkway. Arrest made.

12:42 p.m. Burglary and grand theft on Sebastopol Avenue. Submitted to the District Attorney for review.

10:04 p.m. Vandalism, tamper with vehicle and petty theft on Morris Street. Pending further investigation.

Sonoma County Sheriff’s Logs

MONDAY, JANUARY 14

1:05 a.m. Suspicious vehicle at Main Street and Tyrone Road, Monte Rio. Contacted.

1:43 a.m. Suspicious person at Church Street and Fourth Street, Guerneville. Contacted.

1:50 a.m. Disturbance (unwanted guest) at Church Street and First Street, Guerneville. Completed.

9:37 a.m. Suspicious vehicle occupied at Highway 116 and Fern Road, Guerneville. Contacted.

11:36 a.m. Petty theft at First Street and Mill Street, Guerneville. Arrest made.

12:17 p.m. Disturbance at Ben Way and Seaview Road, Timber Cove. Contacted.

4:03 p.m. Suspicious vehicle at Highway 1 and Stone Crop Reach, Sea Ranch. Contacted.

9:03 p.m. Disturbance at Highway 116 and Solaridge, Guerneville. Contacted.

10:19 p.m. Illegal entry at Highland Avenue and Sunset Avenue, Guerneville. Completed

11:28 p.m. Suspicious person at Park Avenue and Old Redwood Highway, Monte Rio. Agency assist.

11:28 p.m. Disturbance at Highway 116 North and Redwood Glade, Monte Rio. Completed.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 15

1:06 a.m. Suspicious vehicle occupied at First Street and Mill Street, Guerneville. Reprimand and release.

7:06 a.m. Forgery reported at Scanlon Road and Cazadero Highway, Cazadero. Civil situation.

8:15 a.m. Burglary at Church Street and First Street, Guerneville. Contacted.

10:22 a.m. Suspicious person at Armstrong Woods Road, First Street and Main Street, Guerneville. Homeless related.

11:59 a.m. Suspicious

circumstances at Wilshire Drive and Stutz Lane, Forestville. Contacted.

12:19 p.m. Call for help at River Road and Main Street, Guerneville. Homeless related.

5:03 p.m. Fight at Rotunda Way, Canyon Two Road and Canyon Three Road, Rio Nido. Gone on arrival.

7:18 p.m. Disturbance at Willow Road and Canyon Two Road, Rio Nido. Contacted.

8:18 p.m. Disturbance at River Road and Main Street, Guerneville. Homeless related.

8:38 p.m. Suspicious vehicle occupied at Mesa Grande Terrace and Monte Vista Terrace, Duncan’s Mills. Homeless related.

11:50 p.m. Suspicious circumstances at Highway 116 North and C Street, Monte Rio. Contacted.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16

10:26 p.m. Disorderly conduct (alcohol-related), obstructing/resisting a peace officer/emergency medical technician and probation violation on Petaluma Avenue. Arrest made.

11:51 p.m. Attempted burglary on Gravenstein Highway North. Pending further investigation.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17

7:56 a.m. Suspicious vehicle occupied at Monte Vista Terrace and Vista Way, Monte Rio. Contacted.

8:56 a.m. Suspicious vehicle at Bohemian Highway and Church Street, Monte Rio. Contacted.

5:43 p.m. Disturbance at Guerne Way and Drake Road, Guerneville. Contacted.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 18

5:33 a.m. Welfare check at Bay Avenue and Hay Lane, Rio Nido. Transported.

6:57 a.m. Petty theft at First Street and Mill Street, Guerneville. Homeless related.

1:34 p.m. Suspicious person at Mill Street and Main Street, Guerneville. Citation issued.

2:38 p.m. Drinking in public at Mill Street and Main Street, Guerneville. Homeless related.

2:04 p.m. Resisting a peace officer at Mill Street and Main Street, Guerneville. Citation issued.

4:12 p.m. Bomb/explosive disposal reported at Pacific View Drive and Furlong Court, Jenner.

5:05 p.m. Fight at Neeley Road, Highway 116 and Drake Road, Guerneville. Gone on arrival.

5:11 p.m. Suspicious vehicle at Drake Road and Drake Road Extension, Guerneville. Homeless related.

5:17 p.m. Disturbance at Neeley Road, Highway 116 and Drake Road, Guerneville. Contacted.

6:19 p.m. Suspicious circumstances at Woodside Road and Canyon Road, Forestville. Contacted.

7:16 p.m. Violation of probation at First Street and Mill Street, Guerneville. Arrest made.

9:15 p.m. Burglary at Hazel Way, South Street and Main Street, Monte Rio. Report taken.

10:58 p.m. Traffic stop at Foothill Boulevard and River Road, Guerneville. Advised.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 19

3:19 a.m. Traffic stop at River Road and Bonita Avenue, Guerneville. Citation issued.

9:27 a.m. Auto burglary at Heron Drive and Surfbird Court, Bodega Bay. Report taken.

10:19 a.m. Wanted person at Coleman Valley Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. Arrest made.

12:45 p.m. Burglary at Center Way and Guernewood Road, Guerneville. Contacted.

3:54 p.m. Petty theft at Pole Mountain Road and Austin Creek Road, Cazadero. Contacted.

8:53 p.m. Suspicious vehicle

occupied at Greenwood Lane and Green Valley Road, Graton. Contacted.

10:04 p.m. Traffic stop at Eagle Nest Lane and River Road, Rio Nido. Railroad incident.

10:50 p.m. Warrant service at River Road and Orchard Road, Guerneville. Arrest made.

11:46 p.m. Suspect contact at Pocket Drive and Highway 116 North, Guerneville. Arrest made.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 20

1:07 a.m. Suspicious vehicle at First Street and Mill Street, Guerneville. Contacted.

8:54 a.m. Petty theft at Mill Street and Fourth Street, Guerneville. Contacted.

9:24 a.m. Illegal entry at River Road and Main Street, Guerneville. Homeless related.

9:30 a.m. Disturbance at Martinelli Road and Main Street, Forestville. Civil situation.

9:45 a.m. Disturbance at Highway One and Johns Street, Valley Ford. Contacted.

3:03 p.m. Suspicious circumstances at Highway 116 North and Solaridge Road, Guerneville. Contacted.

5:19 p.m. Rescue reported at Jetty Campground and Doran Beach Road, Bodega Bay. Advised.

10:40 p.m. Verbal disturbance at Austin Creek Road and Kramer Road, Cazadero. Resolved.

10:48 p.m. Disturbance at Wee Way and Drake Road, Guerneville. Contacted.

11:06 p.m. Verbal disturbance at Wee Way and Drake Road, Guerneville. Contacted.

11:09 p.m. Disturbance at Rotunda Way, Canyon Two and Three Roads, Rio Nido. Resolved.

County's mental health crisis team expands into west county – Sonoma West

Who would you call if a loved one had a psychotic break? Many people’s first impulse is to call the police, but in high-profile cases in Sebastopol and around the country, a visit from law enforcement has sometimes ended in the death of the mentally ill person they’d originally been called to help.

When The Washington Post analyzed 462 police shooting deaths nationwide in the first half of 2015, they found that one-quarter of those deaths involved people “in the throes of emotional or mental crisis.”

That’s why Sonoma County created the Mobile Support Team, a crisis response team of trained behavioral health professionals who accompany police to calls involving people experiencing mental health emergencies.

The Mobile Support Team was the brainchild of 3rd District Supervisor Shirlee Zane, a former therapist who is well known for her advocacy of mental health.

Zane began advocating for the creation of a Mobile Support Team as soon as she became supervisor in 2009, inspired in part by the shooting death of Sebastopol teenager Jeremiah Chass, who was killed by two Sonoma County Sheriff’s deputies during a mental health emergency in 2008.

“I thought, ‘Why are we expecting law enforcement officers to be therapists?’” said Zane, who had worked with law enforcement as an on-call therapist for runaways through Social Advocates for Youth. “That’s not what they’re trained to do. They’re not hardwired like a therapist at all.”

Working with law enforcement, health services and mental health advocates, Zane helped launch the Mobile Support Team in Santa Rosa and Windsor in 2012. In 2015, it expanded into Rohnert Park, Cotati and Petaluma. Last week the program expanded into west county, including Sebastopol, Graton, Forestville, Rio Nido and Guerneville.

 “It took my first four years as supervisor to launch the Mobile Support Team program,” Zane said, “and it is wonderful to see it grow to include more areas in the county.”

Sonoma County’s Mobile Support Team consists of six full-time behavioral health experts — two drug and alcohol specialists, three therapists and one social worker. They work a swing shift from 1 to 9 p.m. because that’s when the majority of mental health calls come in.

According to Karin Sellite, who manages the program, the Mobile Support Team was involved in over a thousand encounters last year.

Concerned family members can’t call the Mobile Support Team directly, however. The team is set up to act as a support for law enforcement; the responding officer has to make the choice to call them in.

“Law enforcement calls us whenever they think we’d be useful,” Sellite said. “They go out first, and we meet them there.”

Lt. Adrian Mancilla is the liaison between the county sheriff’s office and the county’s behavioral health department.

“Sheriff’s deputies are always the first people on the scene,” he said. “We make the first contact with the people who need help, and it’s our job to diffuse the situation and make sure there are no weapons involved. The Mobile Support Team comes in behind us after the scene is secured to talk to the people and get them the help they need.”

“Mobile Support Team members always go out in teams of two people,” Sellite said. “The officer briefs us on what they know. Then one of us will talk to the person in question, while the other team member gathers information from family, friends or neighbors.”

“We have a standard crisis assessment and violence risk assessment that we do,” Sellite said. “After talking to the people on the scene, my two staff members come back together and share information and decide what to do.”

Between a quarter to a third of the time, Sellite said, team members decide that the person is a threat to themselves or others and invoke a 72-hour involuntary psychiatric hold, known as a 5150. They write the order for the hold, then law enforcement transports the person to the crisis stabilization unit on Challenger Way in Santa Rosa.

“If we don’t do an involuntary hold, then we talk to them about what the plan is,” she said. “We do a lot of talking about how to get through tonight and who can you talk to tomorrow. Do you have a doctor, a psychiatrist, a therapist you can get in touch with? If not, we get them in touch with those services.”

“Back at our office, we write up assessments,” she said, “and, with the individuals’ permission, we share those assessments with people’s treatment providers so they know what’s going on with their clients. And then we do follow-up.

“Because we’re seeing people in crisis, we call them the next day and a couple days later and ask them how they’re doing and if they’re following through with the plan we made and if not, why not? Do they need more resources or more help getting connected with services?”

According to Zane, the Mobile Support Team program was founded on the skinniest of budgets, but now has three sources of funding: the California Mental Health Services Act (Proposition 64), a tax on luxury items over $1 million which California voters passed in 2004; the Mental Health Wellness Act of 2013 (SB82), which provides grants for mental health crisis services; and a special allocation from the Sonoma County General Fund.

While the main purpose of the Mobile Support Team is to get those experiencing behavioral health emergencies the services they need, the program also reduces strain on law enforcement and prevents individuals in crises from impacting the jail system.

“The County’s Mobile Support Team has been a great mental health resource for our deputies in the field, handling crisis situations,” newly elected County Sheriff Mark Essick said. “I’m very excited to see the expansion of these services to new areas of the county.”

Mancilla said that, although all sheriff’s deputies take a 32-hour crisis intervention training, most officers are happy to have other professionals on site to help out.

“They make our job so much easier,” he said.

Zane agrees.

“It saves valuable man-hours for law enforcement, and it’s another valuable tool that law enforcement has in their tool belt to do their jobs better and to save lives,” she said.

It’s hard to measure how many lives the Mobile Support Team has saved. No one keeps records on suicides and police shootings that don’t happen.

“I know it’s making a difference,” Zane said. “In the very first week after it started, I was at a ribbon cutting and a woman came up to me and said, ‘I just want you to know that you saved my client’s life. He was having a psychotic break, and they called 911. I honestly believe that he would have killed himself or been killed had the Mobile Support Team not come out, talked him down and gotten him back into therapy.’” 

“Providing the right intervention at the moment of crisis is so important,” Zane said. “It can change somebody’s life. It can literally save a life.”

To learn more about the DHS Behavioral Health Division’s Mobile Support Team, go to https://sonomacounty.ca.gov/Health/Behavioral-Health/Community-Response-and-Engagement/Mobile-Support-Team/.

Judge denies plea to dismiss Guerneville hate-crime case – Sonoma West

Trial set for Feb. 15

A judge has ruled that Vincent O’Sullivan must stand trial on hate-crime charges for allegedly threatening to make pipe bombs last year to blow up gay residents of Guerneville.

In arguing for dismissal of the case, defense attorney Martin Woods said O’Sullivan’s constitutional rights were violated during prior court proceedings, starting with a preliminary hearing last May. “Mr. O’Sullivan never got a chance” to offer a proper defense in his preliminary court hearing last year, said Woods in a Dec. 24 hearing before Superior Court Judge Brad DeMeo.

Woods argued that O’Sullivan’s dismissal was warranted because of “denial of substantial rights, that of effective cross-examination, deprivation of statutory powers of the magistrate, and the use of improper bootstrapped evidence,” said Woods, in his written plea to have the case dismissed.

O’Sullivan is charged with threatening a gay employee, Hank Meyers, who was serving O’Sullivan at the Starbucks in the Guerneville Safeway last May when Meyers said the threats were made. Whether Meyers suffered “sustained fear” owing to O’Sullivan’s conduct has been a prominent legal question in the case.

When O’Sullivan, a regular customer at the Safeway, ordered his usual coffee drink, a caramel macchiato with breve, on Mother’s Day last year, “He stated in a matter-of-fact tone of voice that he was building two pipe bombs and he was going to ‘blow up Safeway and you (Mr. Meyers), you [expletive] faggot,’ as well as the Sheriff’s Substation,” said Woods, in his court motion. O’Sullivan also said he planned to use bombs against “all the [expletive] faggots” in the Guerneville area, according to earlier court testimony by Meyers.

But after hearing the bomb threat, Meyers went about his work and finished making O’Sullivan’s macchiato which took approximately four minutes, and then continued working for another hour and a half before reporting the incident, according to court testimony.

Whether Meyers’ delay in reporting the incident indicates that he felt that O’Sullivan’s threat was not serious has been the focus of legal wrangling over whether the felony hate crime allegation meets the criteria in California Penal Code Section 422.

The law prohibits the use of force or threat of force “because of a victim’s actual or perceived race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, sexual orientation, gender or disability,” notes the Sonoma County District Attorney’s website.

The alleged bomb threats were made while O’Sullivan was already under investigation for stealing a gay pride flag from the Guerneville town plaza. O’Sullivan was charged with misdemeanor petty theft for the pride flag theft last April but a visiting judge, Andria Richey, dismissed the more serious felony hate crime charge, citing Meyer’s delay in reporting the incident.

In arguing for a dismissal, attorney Woods reiterated that O’Sullivan’s remarks about bombs “were so insignificant that Mr. Meyers continued working for one and a half hours” until a sheriff’s deputy came into the Safeway in response to a shoplifting report. Woods said that Meyers’s delay in reporting the threat supports the defense contention that the there is “no credible evidence of sustained fear as required under Penal Code section 422,” said Woods’ motion for dismissal.

In June the Sonoma County District Attorney’s office successfully persuaded a second judge, Jennifer Dollard, to reinstate the hate crime charge.

“Guerneville is well-known as an LGBT friendly resort town with many openly gay residents and numerous establishments that cater to gay clientele,” said Deputy District Attorney Robert Maddock in a court brief supporting the felony hate-crime charge.

O’Sullivan “is totally unapologetic for his conduct,” said Maddock. “There is no dispute that the crime was motivated by the hatred of homosexuals,” said Maddock. “The threats were very serious and disturbing. In the violent, hate-filled climate in which we find ourselves in 2018, the court should not reduce the charge.”

In denying Woods’ motion to dismiss the case, Judge DeMeo said Woods’ procedural questions regarding O’Sullivan’s earlier hearings were not sufficient to dismiss the charges.

After weighing prosecution and defense arguments, “I think we are left with the conclusion the motion should be denied,” said DeMeo. “I’m denying the motion, but not without some cognition of the inherent problems with the process.”

The judge set a February 15 trial date for O’Sullivan, who remains in custody in Sonoma County jail.

Stabbing & DUI Crash Details From Deputies In Nearby Rio Nido – Patch.com

RIO NIDO, CA – The Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office released additional details Friday about a Jan. 8 domestic violence stabbing in a Rio Nido residence and a subsequent DUI crash that injured three people.

Two deputies responded to the 15000 block of Rio Nido Road east of Guerneville after a dispatcher received a 911 call from that address around 9:30 p.m., Sgt. Spencer Crum said.

The caller hung up and deputies found the front door closed, lights on and a dog barking inside the unoccupied home. There was a key in a dead bolt lock on the front door, and deputies found blood drops throughout the home, Crum said.

Neighbors identified the residents and said they heard a woman yelling inside the home about five minutes before deputies arrived. A third responding deputy came upon an Acura SUV rollover crash into a tree on River Road near Woolsey Road, Crum said.

Jennifer Skelton, 43, and her unidentified 31-year-old boyfriend who lived in the Rio Nido home, were ejected from the rear window of the Acura. Skelton’s boyfriend appeared to have multiple stab wounds to his chest, hands and face, Crum said.

The driver of the Acura, Heidi Allen, 43, of Guerneville, was extricated from the Acura and the California Highway Patrol arrested her for DUI before she was released to Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital, CHP Officer David deRutte said.

Sheriff’s detectives determined Allen was heavily intoxicated and fell asleep at the Rio Nido residence before she was awoken by a domestic violence incident between Skelton and her boyfriend, both of whom who were also intoxicated, Crum said.

Skelton allegedly stabbed her boyfriend at least once with a kitchen knife, and detectives collected other knives in the home as evidence, Crum said.

Allen was driving Skelton and her boyfriend to the hospital before the crash, Crum said. All three remain in a hospital.

The sheriff’s office secured a warrant for Skelton’s arrest for felony domestic violence and assault with a deadly weapon when she recovers from her injuries and leaves the hospital, Crum said.

–Bay City News/Shutterstock image

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Sonoma sheriff: Woman stabs boyfriend; rush to hospital ends in DUI crash – Laredo Morning Times

A couple’s drunken altercation ended in a man being stabbed and rushed to the hospital by a friend, but the intoxicated woman behind the wheel crashed the vehicle, leaving all three individuals with serious injuries, Sonoma County officials said Friday.

A sheriff’s office dispatcher answered a 911 call around 9:30 p.m. on Jan. 8 from a home on the 15000 block of Rio Nido Road in Rio Nido, but the caller hung up, officials said. Sonoma County sheriff’s deputies performed a welfare check shortly after at the home a mile northeast of Guerneville.

Upon entering the home, two deputies found a key in the front door’s dead-bolt lock, a barking dog, multiple knives and a trail of blood drops, said Sgt. Spencer Crum, a Sheriff’s Office spokesman. A neighbor told officers a woman had been heard yelling five minutes before they arrived.

A third sheriff’s deputy driving toward the Rio Nido home found a grisly scene 12 miles away: an overturned white Acura SUV near the intersection of River and Woolsey roads.

“The deputy had not observed the crash, but he was responding to the call and then came upon the crash,” Crum said.

Jennifer Skelton, 41, and her 31-year-old boyfriend, who both lived in the Rio Nido home, were ejected from the vehicle through the rear window when the car flipped over, authorities said. Neither wore a seat belt.

The man had multiple stab wounds to the chest, hands and face, Crum said. The Sheriff’s Office is not identifying the man because he is a domestic violence victim.

Investigators believe Skelton stabbed her boyfriend with a kitchen knife.

First responders took the couple, along with Guerneville resident Heidi Allen, 43, to a local hospital. Allen was sleeping in the home and awoke to an altercation between Skelton and her boyfriend, and drove the two to seek medical attention, authorities said.

Each of the three were heavily under the influence of alcohol, Crum said.

“All have been in the hospital unable to talk for some period of time,” Crum said, noting that their conditions delayed the Sheriff’s Office from releasing a report.

Allen’s and the victim’s conditions were unknown as of Friday, and authorities did not know where the dog heard barking at the scene had gone.

Skelton will be booked into Sonoma County Jail for felony domestic violence and assault with a deadly weapon after she is released from the hospital, according to the Sheriff’s Office. Allen faces a felony DUI charge.

Gwendolyn Wu is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. Email: gwendolyn.wu@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @gwendolynawu

Rio Nido Woman Accused Of Domestic Violence In Stabbing – Patch.com

RIO NIDO, CA — The Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office released additional details Friday about a Jan. 8 domestic violence stabbing in a Rio Nido residence and a subsequent DUI crash that injured three people.

Two deputies responded to the 15000 block of Rio Nido Road east of Guerneville after a dispatcher received a 911 call from that address around 9:30 p.m., Sgt. Spencer Crum said.

The caller hung up and deputies found the front door closed, lights on and a dog barking inside the unoccupied home. There was a key in a dead bolt lock on the front door, and deputies found blood drops throughout the home, Crum said.

Neighbors identified the residents and said they heard a woman yelling inside the home about five minutes before deputies arrived. A third responding deputy came upon an Acura SUV rollover crash into a tree on River Road near Woolsey Road, Crum said.

Jennifer Skelton, 43, and her unidentified 31-year-old boyfriend who lived in the Rio Nido home, were ejected from the rear window of the Acura. Skelton’s boyfriend appeared to have multiple stab wounds to his chest, hands and face, Crum said.

The driver of the Acura, Heidi Allen, 43, of Guerneville, was extricated from the Acura and the California Highway Patrol arrested her for DUI before she was released to Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital, CHP Officer David deRutte said.

Sheriff’s detectives determined Allen was heavily intoxicated and fell asleep at the Rio Nido residence before she was awoken by a domestic violence incident between Skelton and her boyfriend, both of whom who were also intoxicated, Crum said.

Skelton allegedly stabbed her boyfriend at least once with a kitchen knife, and detectives collected other knives in the home as evidence, Crum said.

Allen was driving Skelton and her boyfriend to the hospital before the crash, Crum said. All three remain in a hospital.

The sheriff’s office secured a warrant for Skelton’s arrest for felony domestic violence and assault with a deadly weapon when she recovers from her injuries and leaves the hospital, Crum said.

By Bay City News Service

Photo via Shutterstock

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Sonoma sheriff: Woman stabs boyfriend; rush to hospital ends in DUI crash – San Francisco Chronicle

A couple’s drunken altercation ended in a man being stabbed and rushed to the hospital by a friend, but the intoxicated woman behind the wheel crashed the vehicle, leaving all three individuals with serious injuries, Sonoma County officials said Friday.

A sheriff’s office dispatcher answered a 911 call around 9:30 p.m. on Jan. 8 from a home on the 15000 block of Rio Nido Road in Rio Nido, but the caller hung up, officials said. Sonoma County sheriff’s deputies performed a welfare check shortly after at the home a mile northeast of Guerneville.

Upon entering the home, two deputies found a key in the front door’s dead-bolt lock, a barking dog, multiple knives and a trail of blood drops, said Sgt. Spencer Crum, a Sheriff’s Office spokesman. A neighbor told officers a woman had been heard yelling five minutes before they arrived.

A third sheriff’s deputy driving toward the Rio Nido home found a grisly scene 12 miles away: an overturned white Acura SUV near the intersection of River and Woolsey roads.

“The deputy had not observed the crash, but he was responding to the call and then came upon the crash,” Crum said.

Jennifer Skelton, 41, and her 31-year-old boyfriend, who both lived in the Rio Nido home, were ejected from the vehicle through the rear window when the car flipped over, authorities said. Neither wore a seat belt.

The man had multiple stab wounds to the chest, hands and face, Crum said. The Sheriff’s Office is not identifying the man because he is a domestic violence victim.

Investigators believe Skelton stabbed her boyfriend with a kitchen knife.

First responders took the couple, along with Guerneville resident Heidi Allen, 43, to a local hospital. Allen was sleeping in the home and awoke to an altercation between Skelton and her boyfriend, and drove the two to seek medical attention, authorities said.

Each of the three were heavily under the influence of alcohol, Crum said.

“All have been in the hospital unable to talk for some period of time,” Crum said, noting that their conditions delayed the Sheriff’s Office from releasing a report.

Allen’s and the victim’s conditions were unknown as of Friday, and authorities did not know where the dog heard barking at the scene had gone.

Skelton will be booked into Sonoma County Jail for felony domestic violence and assault with a deadly weapon after she is released from the hospital, according to the Sheriff’s Office. Allen faces a felony DUI charge.

Gwendolyn Wu is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. Email: gwendolyn.wu@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @gwendolynawu

Rio Nido woman faces arrest after allegedly stabbing boyfriend with kitchen knife – Sonoma West

Couple ejected from vehicle on the way to ER after assault

A Rio Nido resident faces felony assault charges after allegedly stabbing her boyfriend with a kitchen knife on the evening of Jan. 8, according to Sonoma County Sheriff’s Public Information Officer Sgt. Spencer Crum.

Sheriff’s detectives have secured a warrant to arrest Jennifer Skelton, 43, after she recovers from injuries sustained in a vehicle collision that took place on the night of the incident. The current charges against Skeleton are felony domestic violence and assault with a deadly weapon.

According to sheriff’s reports, a call came into sheriff’s dispatch shortly after 9:30 p.m. on Jan. 8. The unknown caller promptly hung up after the call was answered. “The 911 screen indicated the call originated from the 1500 block of Rio Nido Road, just east of Guerneville,” Crum said.

Deputies responded to the home to check the welfare of the occupants. Upon arrival they found the front door closed, lights on in the home and a dog barking inside. Deputies also found a key in the dead bolt lock on the front door.

“Fearing something was wrong, deputies announced their presence and entered the home where they found blood drops throughout the home,” Crum said.

After searching the residence, deputies concluded no one was present.

“Neighbors were able to provide names of the residents, and one person stated they heard a woman yelling in the home about five minutes prior to the deputies’ arrival,” Crum said.

While the home was being secured, another deputy came upon a car crash on River Road near Woolsey Road. Two people were found on the ground outside the vehicle as a result of being ejected in the rollover crash.

One person was confirmed to be a resident of the Rio Nido Road home and had suffered what appeared to be multiple stab wounds to his chest, hands and face. As a victim of domestic violence, his name will not be released. The driver and two passengers sustained significant injuries and were transported by ambulance to local hospitals.

After further investigation, detectives determined that Heidi Allen, 43, of Guerneville was heavily intoxicated and asleep at the Rio Nido home when she was woken up by the domestic violence incident between Skelton and her boyfriend.

Detectives confirmed both Skeleton and her boyfriend live in the Rio Nido home. “During the incident it is believed that Skelton stabbed her boyfriend with a kitchen knife at least one time. Several knives were located in the home and collected as evidence,” Crum said.

Seeing that the man needed medical attention, Allen started to drive the couple to the hospital in her white Acura SUV but crashed on the way. According to the report, Skelton and her boyfriend were seated in the back of the SUV and were not wearing seat belts. They were both ejected from the rear windows of the vehicle.

Crum said California Highway Patrol is charging Allen as a suspect in a felony DUI crash. Skelton and her boyfriend were also determined to be heavily intoxicated at the time.

Health conditions of Allen and the stab-wound victim have not been released.