Freeze Warning Lower Russian RiverLocal Weather Alerts

Freeze Warning
...freeze Warning Remains In Effect From 1 Am To 8 Am Pst Monday... * What...minimum Temperatures Between 28 And 32 Degrees Expected Over The Normally Colder Areas Of The San Joaquin Valley Prior To Daybreak Monday With Widespread Frost. * Where...the Central And Southern San Joaquin Valley. ...Read More.
Effective: November 30, 2020 at 1:00amExpires: November 30, 2020 at 8:00amTarget Area: Bakersfield; Eastern San Joaquin Valley in Kern County; Foggy Bottom; Fresno; Merced and Madera; San Joaquin Confluence; Southern Kings County; Tulare County; Western San Joaquin Valley; Western San Joaquin Valley in Kern County

River history through its bars
Local News

River history through its bars

The Russian River Historical Society will open a historic photo exhibit this Saturday, May 5, celebrating memories of the Russian River’s bars, restaurants and taverns. The exhibit in the historic Bank Club building at the corner of Guerneville’s Main and Church streets with the opening celebration from 1 to 3 p.m.

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Historic photos and lore from the society’s archives will offer a glimpse into the river’s old watering holes dating back to the 1920s and including some that are still in business such as Monte Rio’s Village Inn and Pat’s Restaurant and Bar in Guerneville. The archives include images of the old Guernewood Tavern that burned down in 1971, Elim Grove in Cazadero and River’s End in Jenner, said Russian River Historical Society President Jane Barry.

Saturday is also the third anniversary of the opening of the historic Bank Club building’s resurrection as a downtown ice cream parlor, gift shop and wine-tasting room.

“We’ll be celebrating the old bars and the bank,” said Barry. Live music will be provided by the Out of the Blue band playing old time jazz and western swing.

Monte Rio resident Harriet Hamilton and family are sponsoring the exhibit, said Barry.

Guerneville School opens second educational garden | News – Sonoma West
Local News

Guerneville School opens second educational garden | News – Sonoma West

Crisp-looking lettuce and herbs poked up from neat rows of raised beds made of galvanized metal when they cut the ribbon Saturday at Guerneville School’s new outdoor garden classroom.

More than 60 people turned out for a look at the new classroom where Guerneville students will learn how to grow healthy food using eco-friendly garden technology.

Guerneville School Superintendent Dana Pedersen cut the ribbon with the help of west county Supervisor Lynda Hopkins and food writer Clark Wolf, one of the school garden’s founding supporters.

Wolf and Pedersen served as co-hosts and announced plans to promote Guerneville School’s original and now “historic” school garden to rent out for future public and private gatherings such as picnics and weddings. The old garden, started a dozen years ago, occupies five acres of open space at the end of Carrier Lane.

The old garden will “continue to be the umbrella” for the school’s gardening activities but will now also be available to accommodate events.

Gardening class activity will now take place at the new enclosed on-campus garden that’s closer to amenities such as rest rooms, said Pedersen. Pedersen said that despite the move, the old garden “is still alive and well. It’s a beautiful space.”

The school district owns the space and is looking at it as an educational resource and a moneymaker for the district, said Wolf.

“The possibilities are extraordinary,” said Wolf. “We really need to share this space.”

Guerneville restaurateur and caterer Crista Luedtke, who runs the Boon Hotel & Spa across Armstrong Woods Road from the school, has been helping with maintenance and preservation of the old garden where there’s a fruit orchard and an outdoor kitchen.

Luedtke will serve as the conduit to help orchestrate events at the school’s old garden site, said Wolf.

The addition of a new separate teaching garden on campus reflects the successful student interest in gardening and food, said Wolf.

“When we started the [old] garden out there we didn’t know how many students would be interested,” said Wolf. “Now we know. It’s everybody.”

The new outdoor classroom occupies schoolyard space where some 40-year-old portable classrooms were removed. The 3,000-square-foot space is securely fenced and looks less farm-like and more like a playground with planters compared with the historic garden’s rustic five-acre meadow. The new garden’s location on campus makes it more accessible for kindergarten through 8th graders who formerly had to walk through a neighboring field to get to their garden classes.

The new space “will be used every single day” as an outdoor classroom, said Pedersen.

On Saturday afternoon Crista Luedtke went to work in the old garden’s outdoor kitchen creating a tasty kale salad made from the garden produce.

Guests at Saturday’s ribbon cutting included a busload of Sonoma County Certified Tourism Ambassadors representing the Sonoma County Tourism Board. The garden event was also on the Sonoma County Farm Trails tour.